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"cold hands and feet during a migraine"

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DizzyLizzy Click to EMail DizzyLizzyClick to view user profileClick to check IP address of the poster Oct-01-02, 03:27 PM (CMT)
"cold hands and feet during a migraine"
Does anyone else experience this? I always get cold hands and feet during a migraine and it is so hard to warm them up. Often, the rest of my body is hot, but my hands and feet remain icy to the touch. If I can get them warm, it helps the pain a bit. Like putting on warm socks and mittens, running my hands under warm water, or putting a heating pad on them.

I have always taken it for granted but now I'm wondering if others experience this. Does anyone know why this happens? It's very uncomfortable as the rest of me feels feverish and sweaty.

Have a good October everyone!!

Liz

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 Table of contents

RE: cold hands and feet during a mi..., Richard, Oct-01-02, (1)
RE: cold hands and feet during a mi..., Stopper, Oct-01-02, (2)
RE: cold hands and feet during a mi..., ejvill, Oct-01-02, (4)
Thanks for the info, DizzyLizzy, Oct-02-02, (9)
RE: cold hands and feet during a mi..., jodi, Oct-01-02, (3)
RE: cold hands and feet during a mi..., ruth, Oct-01-02, (5)
RE: cold hands and feet during a mi..., Brenda English, Oct-01-02, (6)
RE: cold hands and feet during a mi..., thetsarisa, Oct-01-02, (7)
RE: cold hands and feet during a mi..., Greeneyes, Oct-02-02, (8)
RE: cold hands and feet during a mi..., Sheperd, Oct-02-02, (10)
RE: cold hands and feet during a mi..., ejvill, Oct-02-02, (11)

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Richard Click to EMail RichardClick to view user profileClick to check IP address of the poster Oct-01-02, 03:40 PM (CMT)
1. "RE: cold hands and feet during a migraine"
Hey there,

My neuro says it is not cause and effect of migraine, but my head and hands and feet get real cold along with migraine. Steve can feel my head and tell if an episode is coming on in the near future.

Then again this same neuro says that during my migraines all sorts of wires get crossed in my brain and little surprises him anymore. (grin)

Hang In There!

Richard
Ronda's Cast of Characters http://home.pacbell.net/seprgs/cast100.html

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Stopper Click to EMail StopperClick to check IP address of the poster Oct-01-02, 03:46 PM (CMT)
2. "RE: cold hands and feet during a migraine"
Liz,
I get cold hands and feet and sometimes even a cold nose, although my head usually feels hot.
As a kid I lived in a pretty cold bedroom and I kept the tootsies warm with a hot water bottle.
During killer migs I still use it today even though we live in the Keys and the weather hardly ever gets cold. I associate it with comfort.
Troid
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ejvill Click to EMail ejvillClick to view user profileClick to check IP address of the poster Oct-01-02, 04:34 PM (CMT)
4. "RE: cold hands and feet during a migraine"
LAST EDITED ON Oct-01-02 AT 04:39 PM (CMT)

My hands are always cold and clammy in bio-feedback I learned to warm them up quite well. I also learned that my right is colder than my left but head always feels hot.

Three times a day 10 minutes a day I do mini relaxations and I log my hand temps before/after:

1: I have a quiet mind and calm body

2: My hands are warm and dry

3: My head is cool

4: My heart rate is calm and regular

5: My breathing is slow and deep

6: My muscles are soft and relaxed

7: I am at Peace

This is what I use to warm my hands and cool my head and it works for me and takes me about 10 minutes. If you find these affirmations useful you can use your own words to better help you.

EJ

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DizzyLizzy Click to EMail DizzyLizzyClick to view user profileClick to check IP address of the poster Oct-02-02, 01:51 PM (CMT)
9. "Thanks for the info"
I learned biofeedback when I was a teenager from a psychologist. He put something on my finger... I think to record temperature. Not sure, but I did learn to warm my hands, relax, and even slow my pulse.

I've never been able to be able to do it successfully during a migraine, but thanks for reminding me. I think I will practice up a bit and give it another try.

Yet, another odd thing we share as part of a migraine. I wonder why it is...

Liz

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jodi Click to EMail jodiClick to view user profileClick to check IP address of the poster Oct-01-02, 03:55 PM (CMT)
3. "RE: cold hands and feet during a migraine"
Hi Liz

My hands and feet and head always get cold during a migraine, but everything else is abnormally warm.

If I take a narcotic, I tend to be very hot, but the benadryl seems to help that a little bit.

take care,
jodi

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ruth Click to EMail ruthClick to view user profileClick to check IP address of the poster Oct-01-02, 09:11 PM (CMT)
5. "RE: cold hands and feet during a migraine"
My husband always knows when I have a bad one because of my cold hands and feet! I also did the biofeedback thing and we were given a relaxation tape to listen to and it would go through each part of your body, you would have to start off by saying really soothingly "my right arm is heavy and warm, warmth is flowing into my hand", then the left arm, right leg, left leg, etc. etc. until you went through the whole body.

I have never tried this when I have a migraine, but the other times I've tried, I usually fall asleep before the tape's finished. I should try and remember it more often for the nights I have trouble sleeping. It really does help to make your hands and feet feel warmer, it's weird.

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Brenda English Click to EMail Brenda EnglishClick to view user profileClick to check IP address of the poster Oct-01-02, 09:35 PM (CMT)
6. "RE: cold hands and feet during a migraine"
Yes, my hands and feet always get cold during a migraine. The cold hands come in handy if I'm out and about. I can use them on my head to cool it down. LOL

Brenda English

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thetsarisa Click to EMail thetsarisaClick to view user profileClick to check IP address of the poster Oct-01-02, 11:02 PM (CMT)
7. "RE: cold hands and feet during a migraine"
I disagree with your neuro. What do they really know, after all?
When I have a really bad attack, my feet are freezing. I warm them up with old 2L Coke or other bottle with hot water.
To make the bottle last long, it's filled with very hot water and coverd with big sock.
If there wasn't any connection, how come it happens only during migraine, even under covers, and so many people here have it same way?
Risa
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Greeneyes Click to EMail GreeneyesClick to view user profileClick to check IP address of the poster Oct-02-02, 01:24 PM (CMT)
8. "RE: cold hands and feet during a migraine"
LAST EDITED ON Oct-02-02 AT 01:26 PM (CMT)

Yes, I too have the cold hands and feet. I also have thoracic outlet syndrome (sp?) migraine spelling is gone-ugh!!!!! Wendy R.

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Sheperd Click to EMail SheperdClick to check IP address of the poster Oct-02-02, 03:58 PM (CMT)
10. "RE: cold hands and feet during a migraine"
Hi there,

It was just the other day when I was in a migraine that I noticed my hands were freezing. I haven't noticed this before and I have been getting migraines for over 40 years. I am a lot worse right now than I have ever been so I am more aware of what is going on in my body during the migraine. I haven't noticed the feet but I was thinking it had something to do with our blood pressure. Right now I am well, my hands are warm to touch but when I was in the migraine, they were so cold.

You are not alone.

Sara

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ejvill Click to EMail ejvillClick to view user profileClick to check IP address of the poster Oct-02-02, 04:29 PM (CMT)
11. "RE: cold hands and feet during a migraine"
This was pulled out of Natural Migraine Treatment Faqs I also believe you can find this in one of Ronda's pages.

(5.1)Theory of biofeedback

With biofeedback, a person learns to control a body function
which was not under direct conscious control, but was indirectly
under conscious control.

Here is an example to explain what is meant by a body function
under indirect conscious control. Generally speaking, a person
can't decide to do the following: "I'll flip a coin, and if it
comes up heads, I'll immediately make my heart beat faster, even
though I'll still be sitting down." However, a person can decide,
"If the coin comes up heads, then I'll put up my hand to ask a
question in front of this roomful of people, which I'm nervous
about doing." As soon as the person sees the coin come up heads,
their heart starts to pound because of their nervousness. Yet
all that happened was that they made a decision and then flipped
a coin. Thus, their conscious thoughts affected the heart rate.
In this way, heart rate is indirectly under conscious control.

Body functions such as muscle tension, finger temperature, and
levels of some hormones in the blood (such as adrenalin in the
above example) are under indirect conscious control. Some of
these functions are involved in headaches.

Biofeedback means making information about one's body available
to the conscious mind. Devices which measure muscle tension,
finger temperature etc. and which supply that information to the
person are biofeedback devices.

Gradually, a person learns the semi-conscious thought patterns
that make the device show the desired result, such as warm
fingers. It's like learning to ride a bicycle. Once the skill
has been learned, the person can use it at any time, without
needing the biofeedback device. For example, a person who has
gone through many learning sessions with a thermometer and has
learned to warm their fingers can then warm their fingers after
that without using a thermometer.

(5.2) Handwarming biofeedback

Phase I of a migraine is similar to what the body does in
response to fear, though the reaction may have been caused by a
food the person ate rather than by actual fear. In phase I,
blood is reallocated out of the hands and head and into the large
muscles that would be used for running from danger. The hands,
especially the fingertips, become cold when the blood is
withdrawn. The feeling of confusion, or inability to think
clearly, that can accompany phase I is similar to fainting from
fear.

The pain occurs in phase II, when the blood vessels of the head
and neck over-react and re-expand to larger than the normal size.
The headache can be prevented by reducing the severity of phase
I, thus preventing phase II.

The level of the hormones in the blood that contract the blood
vessels, such as serotonin and adrenalin, can be brought under
semi-conscious control. By thinking relaxed thoughts, the
hormone level can be lowered. The serotonin level is monitored
by checking the temperature of the fingertips and hands. During
phase I, first the fingertips and then the hands become cold.
The finger temperature can be checked either with a thermometer,
or by touching the fingertips to your cheeks. If they feel warm
or hot, that's good. They should be at body temperature. If
they're cool or cold, it could be either from being in a cold
room, from poor blood circulation due to diabetes or some other
condition, or from a phase I reaction.

After many attempts of trying to think relaxed thoughts and
checking the finger temperature, a person gradually learns how to
get into the right frame of mind to affect the serotonin levels.
Eventually, a person can decide to warm up the fingers, meditate
for a while, and the fingers become warm. Under a lot of stress,
for example if you're about to speak in front of an audience, it
may be impossible to warm the fingers at that time, though
attempting it may reduce the severity of a migraine later. For
learning, it's best to use a low-stress situation such as sitting
at home.

It normally requires trying several times a day for several
weeks before much progress is made. It helps to keep records of
the finger temperature before and after attempting biofeedback.

A person who has learned biofeedback can become aware of their
finger temperature so that they notice when their hands suddenly
become cold. They can then take a break from stressful
activities, relax until their hands warm up, and prevent a
headache from happening. The feeling of confusion and stress
that usually accompanies phase I can mean that you tend not to
notice things like finger temperature at that time -- you're too
busy thinking about whatever is causing the stress -- but
eventually you can learn to notice it.


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